Jumping up on people is a natural form of greeting for a dog. When dogs approach each other, they often sniff each other’s face and ears. Since people walk upright, dogs frequently feel the need to jump up in order to say hello. It is important to teach your dog that the proper way to greet a human is with all four paws on the ground.

The best thing to do when your dog jumps on you is to simply ignore him by folding your arms and turning your back to him. If your dog continues to jump on you, walk away and return in 20 seconds. Repeat this process until you are able to return to the room without being jumped on. Only praise your dog when all four paws are on the floor.

Dodge out of your dog’s path. When your dog starts to jump, say “off” and swiftly step to the side or backwards. Praise when all four paws are on the floor.

Hip check you dog. As he jumps, say “off” while you turn sideways and thrust your hip toward him (dogs use a similar maneuver with each other to show who is in control). This should throw him slightly off balance. Praise when all four feet are on the floor.

Teach your dog how to greet people appropriately by sitting. When you come home or wake in the morning, only pet your dog after he sits. Cue him once to sit. If he does, praise, hug, kiss, etc. to your heart’s content. if he does not sit, walk away and try again in 20 seconds.

You are not the only one who must not pet your dog when he jumps up. When you are on walks, tell him to sit as people approach you. Having him sit before he starts jumping will keep the situation under control. Allow people to pet him as long as he refrains from jumping. If he jumps, say “too bad!” and walk away. He will learn that jumping causes good stuff to end while sitting or standing keeps the petting and treats coming.

DO NOT knee a dog in the chest, yell, hit, or otherwise punish the dog. Doing so could actually teach the dog that being friendly leads to discomfort and people are to be avoided. Kneeing a dog can also injure the dog if done with enough force.

If you would like information from an Anti-Cruelty Society Behavior Specialist regarding this behavior topic, please call 312-645-8253 or email behavior@anticruelty.org.

Recent Articles

Walking a dog who excessively pulls is certainly no “walk in the park.” Tugging and holding your dog back won’t help as a dog’s natural response to pressure is to push into it; the harder you pull, the harder they pull too. Fortunately, there are a variety of ways and tools to help you maintain control over your

Many dogs mark places that are new and unfamiliar to them. Marking behavior can be modified if you start training early. When introducing your dog to your home, be prepared. Here are a couple tricks for a marking-quick-fix.

First Things First…

Spay or neuter your dog as soon as possible. The longer a

Dogs bark for a variety of reasons. Some bark at passer-bys outside the window, while some bark only when you leave the house. The first step in managing your dog’s barking is to determine what exactly is causing it. Below are several reasons why dogs bark and recommendations on how to manage it. 

Territorial/

Digging is a normal behavior for most dogs. For many dogs, it is even instinctual. Digging may occur due to a variety of different reasons, including to seek attention, to hunt prey, comfort or protection, to escape or merely just for their entertainment. 

As with any improper attention seeking behavior, it is