Canine Parvovirus, “parvo”, is a serious and highly contagious disease. Disease transmission occurs through direct dog-to-dog contact or contact with contaminated feces (stool), environments or people. Canine Parvovirus does not affect people.

Common Signs and Symptoms

  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Severe, often bloody, diarrhea

Vomiting and diarrhea can lead to severe dehydration. If your dog is showing any of these signs, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Prevention

Proper vaccinations and good hygiene are a must. If you have a puppy, make sure to stay up to date with vaccinations. Puppies are particularly susceptible to Canine Parvovirus and require a series of vaccinations. Be careful when exposing your puppy to other dogs until the series is finished.

Whenever you suspect an illness, infection or virus of your dog, please contact your veterinarian.

If you would like information from an Anti-Cruelty Society Behavior Specialist regarding this behavior topic, please call 312-645-8253 or email behavior@anticruelty.org.

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