Halloween can be a fun-filled event for humans and pets alike. However with the constant doorbell rings and surge of oddly-dressed strangers, it’s important to consider some safety precautions to keep your pets calm and safe. By keeping these tricks in mind, you’ll be sure to make this Halloween a real treat for both you and your pet.

Use Caution with Costumes

Generally, most pets prefer to walk around au naturel. If your pet will tolerate a costume, make sure that it is entirely pet-safe. Be certain the costume is made of non-toxic and non-flammable material and remove any chewable parts that may pose a choking hazard. Remember that pets can’t talk, so it’s important to keep an eye on their body language. If your pets looks uncomfortable, it’s best to remove the costume. 

Keep the Treats out of Reach

Keep the candy up and out of your pets’ reach at all times. Many popular Halloween candies are toxic to pets. Chocolate, as most people know, is a definite pet no-no. Sugar-free treats should also be avoided as they contain Xylitol, an artificial sweetener that is toxic to pets. Your pet will be happy and safe eating their regular treats. 

Harness the Halloween Hype

With trick-or-treaters ringing your doorbell by the minute, it’s easy for your furry friends to become a little uneasy and anxious. To keep your pets from dashing for the door, keep them in a quiet room with the door shut.  Keep their food, water, litter box, toys and enrichment in the room with them to keep them occupied and comfortable. Make sure your pet is microchipped and has an up-to-date ID tag so that they can be properly identified, in case your pet manages to slip out the door.

If you would like information from an Anti-Cruelty Society Behavior Specialist regarding this behavior topic, please call 312-645-8253 or email help@anticruelty.org.

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